Introducing, Better Out Than In to the BDN blog network

My name is Seth Blais, and I am a person in recovery from a Substance Use Disorder. I have personally struggled with the misuse of drugs and alcohol for more than a decade. I think it’s important to openly and honestly share my experience, and I’m fortunate to be in a position where I feel comfortable doing so.

Seth Blais

Over a period of ten years, I experienced many personal failures and major consequences because of my substance use. During this time, I was [mostly] successful at hiding my use from everyone around me. As an entrepreneur and salesperson, I worked hard to maintain the appearance of success. I never seemed able to reach out for help or be fully honest with myself and those who cared about me.

Today, much of my time is spent reaching out to peers who also struggle with Substance Use Disorders. I volunteer as a Recovery Coach with the Westbrook Recovery Liaison Program and give time advocating for organizations like Young People in Recovery. Giving back is what allows me to remain healthy and happy.

The idea behind this blog is to share my personal experience, honestly and with purpose. I don’t believe there should be stigma attached to being a person in recovery, and there should be no shame in asking for help. If I’m going to make that statement, I feel that I also need to be willing to raise my hand and identify as someone with a Substance Use Disorder.

I’m not an expert or a medical professional, and I’m not qualified to provide treatment or advice. What I can provide, are honest self-reflection, hard-earned life lessons, and relevant commentary on issues surrounding substance use.

For more about me and to stay updated on what I’m up to, follow me on Facebook.

Seth Blais

About Seth Blais

My name is Seth Blais, and I am a person in recovery from a Substance Use Disorder. I have personally struggled with the misuse of drugs and alcohol for more than a decade. I think it’s important to openly and honestly share my experience, and I’m fortunate to be in a position where I feel comfortable doing so. I’m not an expert or a medical professional, and I’m not qualified to provide treatment or advice. What I can provide, are honest self-reflections, hard-earned life lessons, and relevant commentary on issues surrounding substance use.